Flash Communications

Tales from a student-PR agency at Kent State University


Leave a comment

All hail the Queen: how Beyoncé influenced my PR strategies

Flash_Bey

The lessons one can learn from Beyoncé Giselle Knowles-Carter are endless.

In 1999, she taught us to be weary of a significant other who won’t acknowledge your relationship around others.

90S GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

In 2003, she taught us that you need one (or three), things in life: me, myself and I.

Me Myself And I GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

In 2008, she taught us that a diva is a female version of a hustler.

Beyonce GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

In her latest album, she taught us how to get in formation and to always be conscious of how to turn lemons into lemonade.

Vulture.Com GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

Most recently, she taught society just how beautiful motherhood really is.

Recording Academy / Grammys GIF - Find & Share on GIPHY

While the life lessons Queen Bey bestows upon us all would be enough for me – her brilliant and strategic planning has impacted my professional development as well. Beyoncé has been in the industry since the ‘90s, providing constant innovation and inspiration for fellow artists and her fans.
Continue reading


Leave a comment

PR In the News: Oscars in la la Land

It’s the movie industry’s biggest social event of the year: the Oscars. Movie stars line the red carpet in some of the most unique and glamorous outfits money can buy. The 89th celebration, lasting nearly four hours, was going smoothly until it came time to announce Best Picture, when presenters gave the Oscar to “La La Land”, when, to the Academy’s horror, the winner was actually “Moonlight.”

Viewers debated if the presenters were in a la la land of their own, confused about how such a major mishap could occur.

The two presenters, Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, were apparently handed the wrong card backstage. Beatty opened the card, read it and paused for a moment, seeming confused. He then handed the card to Dunaway who announced “La La Land” as the winner. It wasn’t until after the cast and producers were on stage accepting that they corrected the mistake, announcing “Moonlight” as the actual winner.

Immediately this mistake took social media by storm. Twitter began to blow up with posts comparing this mistake to Steve Harvey’s last year when he announced the wrong Miss Universe winner. In light of the joke, Miss Universe tweeted “Have your people call our people – we know what to do #Oscars #MissUniverse”. Following this, Steve Harvey even tweeted “Call me Warren Beatty. I can help you get through this! #Oscars”. Users continued to caption meme’s relating to Steve Harvey.

Other posts compared the mistake to the 2016 election, including tweets “wishing this is what happened with the election.” Users turned the jokes political by bringing up the popular vote issue from the election.

PwC, the accounting and consulting firm that handles the ballot counting process for the Academy Awards, took more than two minutes to take action to correct their mistake during the show.

According to ABC News, PwC had no other option but to be up-front and explain what happened to minimize damage to their reputation and brand. The company tweeted a statement apologizing to Beatty, Dunaway, all of “La La Land” and “Moonlight” several hours after the show ended.

Do you think the company took enough action for damage control? Or should they have stepped up more? Time will tell, but, in my opinion, I think the company could have provided more than a tweet to apologize to viewers and the people affected on-stage. Possibly by apologizing for the mistake themselves while it was happening on live T.V. would have served them better and appealed to viewers emotions better.

The Academy has since released a statement, apologizing to the cast and crew of both movies. The Academy shared the statement on its website and social media.


Leave a comment

FlashCast: YouToo Social Media Conference

Many of our interns helped plan and attend this year’s YouToo Social Media Conference, which took place Friday, April 8, 2016.

Attendees this year heard from a variety of great speakers, including Kyle Michael Miller, lead social media producer for NBC’s TODAY and Scott Monty, CEO and founder of Scott Monty Strategies.

We recapped this year’s YouToo conference and discussed our favorite parts of the day in our latest episode of the FlashCast podcast. Check it out below!

 

What did you think about this year’s YouToo Social Media Conference? Let us know in the comments or by emailing us at flashcomm@kent.edu!


Leave a comment

FlashCast Non Profit Internship Podcast

The latest episode of the FlashCast Podcast is up! This week, we interviewed two Kent State PR majors who have interned at a non profit, and they speak about their internship experiences, how they landed the internship, what they learned and what they wish they would have known before starting.

Questions or comments? Email us at flashcomm@kent.edu.

 


Leave a comment

YouToo Social Media Conference Recap

IMG_0947I can’t believe the ninth-annual YouToo Social Media Conference has already come and gone! A lot of preparation went into the day, and the day could not have turned out better.

Kyle Michael Miller

The morning began with a keynote from Kyle Michael Miller, lead social media producer for NBC’s TODAY show. Kyle spoke about everything from content to his working environment. He reminded us all to look for stories.

One thing he said that really stood out to me was, “People aren’t going to Facebook for the TODAY show. They’re going for their mom, friends and dog.” I thought about that quote a lot during the rest of the day, especially when I was in a later session and Alyssa Purvis from Key Bank said the same thing. Being in charge of a brand, you become enthralled with what the brand is doing, and it’s important to you. However, it may not be so important to others, and that is where creativity and research come in.

Kyle shared with us the story behind the post of Kathie Lee Gifford talking about her recently deceased husband and why it was so successful. “Authentic moments always win in the social space,” Kyle said. People can tell when you’re being unauthentic. People are responsive to raw emotions. As Kyle said, does anyone really pass up a video of a husband crying after seeing his wife’s new makeover?

Another huge theme of the day was social media analytics. Looking at the analytics of posts to see how they were received by your audiences is beyond important. Having the ability to judge the success of a post on more than just how many likes it received can help you craft future posts and learn more about what content is best received by your audiences. Kyle talked for a while on Facebook analytics and how he uses them daily to track the reception of posts. That information then carries over into future posts.

Two key takeaways from Kyle’s keynote:

Continue reading


Leave a comment

FlashCast Corporate Internship Podcast

FlashCast6The Flash Communications staff has been interviewing students with internship experience to learn about their advice for current students. This week’s episode includes three students who have interned in the corporate field.

 

In case you missed our last episode, check out our public affairs episode here:

 

 

Do you have questions about any of our interviews or ideas about what you would like to see us cover? Contact us at flashcomm@kent.edu.


Leave a comment

PR in the News: Erin Andrews lawsuit causes trouble for Marriott

By: Victoria Manenti and Hanna Moore

Erin Andrews was awarded $55 million in her lawsuit against the owner of the Nashville Marriott and her stalker in the case over a secretly filmed nude video.

Andrews, an ESPN reporter at the time, was staying at the hotel, when her long-time stalker Michael Barrett compromised her peephole and was able to film into her room. He was able to find her because a hotel employee honored his request to stay in the room next to hers.

The jury found that Barrett was 51 percent at fault for the incident and liable for 51 percent of the $55 million award, and Windsor Capital Group, the hotel management company, was responsible for the remaining 49 percent.

Not only is this a legal issue but also a huge public relations crisis.

Continue reading