Flash Communications

Tales from a student-PR agency at Kent State University


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Five Tips for Choosing a Good Minor to Complement Public Relations

So you’ve settled into public relations as your major – Congratulations! You’ve chosen well.

But on the first day of classes in your new major, you realize that many of your new classmates not only have their PR major, but also have minors – and some of them have more than one.

You may panic for a second: “Minor?! I just chose my major, and now I have to choose something else?”

Well, never fear! Here are five tips to help you chose the perfect minor:

Passion is key

Passion is key

When it comes to choosing any minor, it’s always good to start with something you’re already passionate about. Do you like fashion? Try a fashion media minor. Do you want to work in the corporate world? Maybe a minor in business or marketing would do the trick. Are you interested in sports? A sports administration minor may be the right fit for you.

Luke Armour, an assistant professor in Kent State’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication (JMC) sequence says that choosing a minor for PR should revolve around your future goals.

“Public relations is a multi-faceted field. You can work in sports, entertainment, healthcare, public affairs, internal communications, technology, higher education – the list goes on and on,” Armour says. “Kent State has a lot of programs that can help you gain a better understanding of a specific field of study that can help you – so be sure to look around. The possibilities are vast.”

Diversify yourself

Diversify Yourself

Along with being something that holds your interest, a great PR minor should help you to stand out among your fellow PR students. The public relations industry is a competitive one, and you should jump at any chance to get a leg up on your opposition.

Michele Ewing, an associate professor in JMC, says that a minor for PR should further enhance a person’s ability as a communicator.

“I especially advocate for students to study a second language,” Ewing says. “Public relations professionals who understand different languages and cultures are more effective communicators – and more marketable for jobs.”

Complement your major

As previously mentioned, minors that complement the PR major should serve as a way to further enhance your education in the PR sequence. For example, a psychology or sociology minor will help public relations students with analyzing audiences and developing a communication strategy. Be sure to think about potential career interests and find a minor that will provide some additional expertise.

Complement your major

Stephanie Smith, an assistant professor in JMC,says that selecting a minor is comparable to  picking a running mate for office.

“You should ask yourself, ‘what makes a good balanced “ticket,” and what will supplement the skills and competencies you don’t have and won’t necessarily get from a PR curriculum?” Smith says. “If you’re not sure what field you want to enter, stay flexible and strategic. I’d look at some fields of study that employment and demographic trends tell us are going to be highly impactful in the future.”

Be decisive

Be Decisive

You don’t need to choose a minor in your first semester, or even in your first year — but once you do decide on a minor you think you’ll like, try to stick with it. Much like changing your major, repeatedly switching minors can set you back for graduation and leave you with a bunch of class credits that don’t go towards anything.

A good way to avoid this is to take a class or two in your chosen subject prior to declaring a minor. You can also meet with an advisor in that program to discuss what requirements accompany each minor you are considering. This way, you can decide whether the minor is for you before fully committing.

Armour also recommends looking directly at the classes you’ll have to add to get your minor.

“Look at the content,” Armour says. “Is it really in line with your interests? Will it make you more valuable to an employer? Will it give you skills or knowledge you need in the industry? And definitely talk to upperclassmen who have selected that minor – are they happy? Be sure to find out everything you can about your prospective minor before you choose it.”

Don’t overwhelm yourself

Don't Overwhelm YourselfIf you’ve read all of the previous advice and are still nervous about choosing a minor, don’t worry! You’re not alone — this just means you’re taking your education in PR seriously, which is a good thing.

Take a deep breath, clear your head and let that knot in your stomach ease up. Declaring a minor isn’t a requirement, nor should it cause you to stress out. Just start from the beginning – make a list of the areas you’re already passionate about, and go from there. There are plenty of resources and people in Kent State’s  public relations department will be there to help you out along the way.


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A Day in the Life: Working at Flash Communications

Flash

What better way to gain real-world experience in the field of public relations than interning through the University Communications and Marketing Department? As a Flash Communications intern, you can quickly enhance your writing, interviewing and time management skills.

At Flash Communications, we primarily write public relations stories or briefs about anything positive, exciting or new happening at any one of the Kent campuses. Flash communications is under the University Communications and Marketing department and is headed by Professor Luke Armour. Every week you’re working on new stories, upcoming events or accomplishments in the Kent Community.

Different roles you may hold are social media management, assisting in event staffing or an assistant coordinator. Working at Flash Communications also allows you to work with professionals like Eric Mansfield and Emily Vincent, giving you a chance to see them in action with their real-world duties. The office environment continues to be exciting and refreshing, allowing you to write stories on different topics in short period of time.

Since we all have a different class schedule, you’re able to work with different interns throughout the week. Every day here is different – one day you may be working on contacting sources or interviewing for a story, writing social media posts or in the office compiling stories for the weekly faculty and staff e-newsletter, E-Inside.

Carly Evans, a junior public relations major, joined Flash Communications this past spring after hearing about the position from a Kent State staff member.

“It’s really cool getting to meet different people all across campus,” Evans says. “You get to know so many faces and personalities around campus.”

Holly Disch, junior public relations major, is in her second semester at Flash Communications and says one of the highlights working here was a jazz story she did last semester on a professor, Bobby Selvaggio, who is an amazing sax artist.

“I got to interview him while also interviewing famous jazz artists because I needed to incorporate more than one source into the story,” Disch says.

Gael Reyes, one of our assistant coordinators here at Flash Communications, says her position has allowed her to gain great experience and build her portfolio.

“It’s an environment that allows me to grow as a student and as a professional,” Reyes says.

Disch says her one of her favorite parts of working here is getting the chance to collaborate with other amazing PR students.

Reyes advises students who are interested in working at Flash Communications to do your research before going into the interview.

“Have a good idea of what we do here at Flash,” Reyes said. “Also, have a solid understanding of PR basics.”

Interested in applying? Send your resume and a list of completed and scheduled JMC classes to Professor Luke Armour at Larmour1@kent.edu by April 21,, 2017.


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Three tips for managing your social media like a pro

Before I took on the position of social media director for Her Campus at Kent State, social media was just another way to entertain myself. I can’t say I never cared about putting effort into maintaining my platforms, but it took on a whole new meaning once I began to manage accounts for work. In the past year, I’ve come to realize a few things about cultivating a successful social media presence. Here are three things to keep in mind that apply to both professional and personal accounts.

  1. Stay true to your brand (yes, you have a brand)

The definition of what a “brand” is constantly changes, but Forbes reports that it is essentially “the intangible sum of a product’s attributes.” You may think this definition only applies to those with a product to sell, but consider this: You are a product and you advertise who you are as a person when you use social media. The key point to remember about your brand on social media is consistency. That’s not to say you don’t have room to grow, but just like you wouldn’t expect ESPN to start tweeting about New York Fashion Week, you too should stay true to your identity.

Here’s an example with the main Huffington Post twitter account dipping their toes into the entertainment world and getting criticized in the replies.

  1. Multimedia elements are your friend

A quick scroll through my timeline shows very few plain text tweets and there’s a good reason for that. According to Twitter, “tweets with photos get 313% more engagement.” Everyone from The White House to “Common White Girl” knows the power of a good multimedia tweet. Just take these posts for example:

  1. Contribute to the Conversation

What are people talking about and how can you become a part of the conversation? Not every situation needs a response and there is something to be said for selective participation, but if it *makes sense for you to participate, then go for it.

Here’s a great example from Her Campus Kent State from our Women’s March coverage. I had one of my social team members live tweet while they marched and a fair number of people picked up this particular tweet.

*see tip #1

I’m sure you know how your social media presence comes off and you were probably already posting pictures and commenting on current events before I told you how important it is. My point is to do these things consciously so that next time you type out a tweet, you know that it’ll be a hit. Now go forth and conquer social media like it’s your job.


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All hail the Queen: how Beyoncé influenced my PR strategies

Flash_Bey

The lessons one can learn from Beyoncé Giselle Knowles-Carter are endless.

In 1999, she taught us to be weary of a significant other who won’t acknowledge your relationship around others.

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In 2003, she taught us that you need one (or three), things in life: me, myself and I.

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In 2008, she taught us that a diva is a female version of a hustler.

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In her latest album, she taught us how to get in formation and to always be conscious of how to turn lemons into lemonade.

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Most recently, she taught society just how beautiful motherhood really is.

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While the life lessons Queen Bey bestows upon us all would be enough for me – her brilliant and strategic planning has impacted my professional development as well. Beyoncé has been in the industry since the ‘90s, providing constant innovation and inspiration for fellow artists and her fans.
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PR In the News: Oscars in la la Land

It’s the movie industry’s biggest social event of the year: the Oscars. Movie stars line the red carpet in some of the most unique and glamorous outfits money can buy. The 89th celebration, lasting nearly four hours, was going smoothly until it came time to announce Best Picture, when presenters gave the Oscar to “La La Land”, when, to the Academy’s horror, the winner was actually “Moonlight.”

Viewers debated if the presenters were in a la la land of their own, confused about how such a major mishap could occur.

The two presenters, Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, were apparently handed the wrong card backstage. Beatty opened the card, read it and paused for a moment, seeming confused. He then handed the card to Dunaway who announced “La La Land” as the winner. It wasn’t until after the cast and producers were on stage accepting that they corrected the mistake, announcing “Moonlight” as the actual winner.

Immediately this mistake took social media by storm. Twitter began to blow up with posts comparing this mistake to Steve Harvey’s last year when he announced the wrong Miss Universe winner. In light of the joke, Miss Universe tweeted “Have your people call our people – we know what to do #Oscars #MissUniverse”. Following this, Steve Harvey even tweeted “Call me Warren Beatty. I can help you get through this! #Oscars”. Users continued to caption meme’s relating to Steve Harvey.

Other posts compared the mistake to the 2016 election, including tweets “wishing this is what happened with the election.” Users turned the jokes political by bringing up the popular vote issue from the election.

PwC, the accounting and consulting firm that handles the ballot counting process for the Academy Awards, took more than two minutes to take action to correct their mistake during the show.

According to ABC News, PwC had no other option but to be up-front and explain what happened to minimize damage to their reputation and brand. The company tweeted a statement apologizing to Beatty, Dunaway, all of “La La Land” and “Moonlight” several hours after the show ended.

Do you think the company took enough action for damage control? Or should they have stepped up more? Time will tell, but, in my opinion, I think the company could have provided more than a tweet to apologize to viewers and the people affected on-stage. Possibly by apologizing for the mistake themselves while it was happening on live T.V. would have served them better and appealed to viewers emotions better.

The Academy has since released a statement, apologizing to the cast and crew of both movies. The Academy shared the statement on its website and social media.


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FlashCast Agency Internship Podcast

For our final episode of the Spring 2016 FlashCast podcast, we interviewed Jennie and Kristen, two #PRKent students who have interned in an agency setting. Jennie interned at an entertainment PR agency in Cleveland, and Kristen interned at a fashion and lifestyle PR agency in New York City.

They speak about their internship experiences, how they landed their internships, what they learned and what they wish they would have known before starting.

Questions or comments? Email us at flashcomm@kent.edu.

 


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FlashCast: From the Internship Providers

In this episode of the FlashCast podcast, we put a call out to professionals who hire public relations interns. Now that we have spoken with students about their internship experiences, we requested that the providers give us some feedback about what they’re looking for as well. We asked them to speak about their advice for students seeking internship and what their team specifically looks for in an internship candidate.

So many thanks to the professionals who speak in this episode! They are, in order of their appearance:

What do you think of their advice? Let us know in the comments below. If you have questions, comments or ideas for podcast topics, let us know at flashcomm@kent.edu.